Rex Stout in Maryland

Nero Wolf and Archie Goodwin are at it again in The Final Deduction. Not one of Stout’s best, a little nipping and tucking in the plot would have helped. This selection was studied by the Macabre group in Maryland that meets bi-monthly. If you know the geography of Maryland, we met at a restaurant by the water this month around Arnold. We missed our fearless leader and decided to ask for volunteers ahead of time for future meetings so no one person would be stuck leading the discussion.

I couldn’t help thinking about Sherlock Holmes when I was reminded of the selection, and there were hints about Agatha Christie in the book too. We were all a little disappointed that there weren’t enough suspects, and the red herrings weren’t followed up. Maybe he was a little rushed on this one.

The best unusual word, at least in my opinion, was thaumaturgury. It’s a good word to look up but might be hard to slip into a conversation. August’s selection will be Gambit.

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Malice Domestic Wrapping Up

The banquet was last night and we are getting close to the end. The winners were announced and there were a few surprises. Ellen Byron won contemporary for her southern mysteries. There were ties in two categories which I don’t think has happened before. Sujata Massey won in historical. Probably every book in the historical category deserved a prize.

A special shout and congratulations to Grace Topping on the publication of her first book and first Malice Panel!

Malice Domestic 2019

The best novels, short stories, and nonfiction books have been nominated for the Agatha Awards. There are a lot of keepers such as Trust Me by Hank Phillippi Ryan and of course Louise Penny has a book nominated too. I’m going to have a particularly hard time voting for only one Best Short Story and one Best Historical Novel. Take a look. The novels are worth picking up, and you can read the short stories at malicedomestic.org/agathas.html

Best Historical Novel

  • Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding by Rhys Bowen
  • The Gold Pawn by LA Chandlar
  • The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey
  • Turning the Tide by Edith Maxwell
  • Murder on Union Square by Victoria Thompson

Best Short Story

  • “All God’s Sparrows” by Leslie Budewitz
  •  “A Postcard for the Dead” by Susanna Calkins
  •  “Bug Appetit” by Barb Goffman
  •  “The Case of the Vanishing Professor” by Tara Laskowski
  •   “English 398: Fiction Workshop” by Art Taylor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Latest in Mysteries

I just finished the latest installment from Louise Penny, and if you are a true mystery fan, you’ve probaby been reading the books nominated and voted on at the latest Bouchercon in St. Petersburg, Florida. If not, do yourself a favor and take a look. Just google, or search if you’re not a googler, Bouchercon.

The organizers did a great job, St. Petersburg was great, and the Wolf Pack had a grand dinner! The Bouchercon next year will be in Dallas.

A to Y – Sue Grafton

I was sad to hear that Sue Grafton had passed away in December. My condolences to her family. I’d been rereading her books inbetween selections for my book clubs etc. in anticipation of “Z.” Her daughter has told us that no one else will write “Z” for her and that she didn’t have a chance to start the last book in her series.

To write such a long series had to be a daunting task. When Bouchercon was in Albany, I had a chance to chat with her. Such a nice lady and her husband seemed like a great guy helping her out. But he did laugh about how she was ready to be done with the series.

Kinsey Milhone is one of my favorite detectives. It’s great fun when there are so many books available too. Ms. Grafton always managed to come up with great plots and keep me rooting for Kinsey and her simple black dress that survived fire and mayhem. It has been so long since I’ve read these books, I don’t know if it appears in “J.” I’ll find out soon enough! Too bad she didn’t want movies made of her books, but her books are a great contribution to the mystery genre as is. If you haven’t read them, give them a try!

Bouchercon 2017 – Toronto – Where It Hurts

If you’ve been wondering about my new background, it’s a street in New Orleans where Bouchercon was held last year. Soon, I’ll be leaving for Toronto for this year’s Bouchercon!

It’s always good to have an incentive to get back on a regular reading schedule! Today’s list is a review of Reed Farrel Coleman’s Where It Hurts. I’ve been known to read a police procedural or a hardboiled mystery once in a while so I wasn’t put off by Gus Murphy, a grieving  ex-cop, who’s lost his family. The formula works to make us feel his pain even though we don’t know for a long time how the instigating action, his son’s death, happened. The character is very likable and I enjoyed his friends from the sleazy hotel, The Paragon, where he now works.

His depiction of the Manhattan island setting was intriguing. Coleman obviously did his homework about the layout of the terrain and how the precincts are setup. Everything was going well until about two-thirds of the way through the book where I felt like I must have missed something. This is the point where I would have expected the logical links of the plot to fall in place. Instead, he tries out one plot ending after another. I lost count of how many times I thought the end was near. Instead, I found myself stumbling along with Coleman until we’re back to the doughnut shop. Did I say I didn’t like the ending? A very likeable lead character though, and Coleman has some obvious writing skills that could be enhanced by a later deadline. Not my pick for the Anthony.

 

Reading on a Summery September Day – Sherlock Holmes and Margaret Atwood

I do love a good mystery and there are so many of them! We are quickly approaching the next Sherlockians of Baltimore meeting which is always great fun in Little Italy (in Baltimore of course.) The meetings are always interesting with analysis by some of our scholars and the quizzes on individual stories. Last time I constructed a crossword puzzle like some of our more gifted members. Little did I know how much time they took to create! I bow my head to all those who do this on a regular basis. Below you will find my puzzle for The Adventure of the Speckled Band by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

Quiz for the Speckled Band

I’ll give you the answers next time.  At the next meeting we’ll have a presentation about Sherlock and Jack the Ripper and will discuss  The Adventure of the Abbey Grange. I’ll have to pull out the Canon to review that one!

This group has been growing by leaps and bounds with some reminders from Greg Ruby who first told me about the group. He even put together a publication of all sorts of interesting bits of information called The Newspapers. One of my short stories about Sissy Holmes who is the reincarnation of Sherlock appears in that issue. It’s available for purchase at http://tinyurl.com/SOBNewspapers if you want to take a look.

What does all of this have to do Margaret Atwood? I just finished reading A Handmaid’s Tale which has been produced for Hulu and is also my book club’s selection. Technically it’s not a mystery, but I would argue that it’s a thriller. Her lead character is always at risk, always fearful that she will die, even to the point of acting like her former life with a husband and child did not exist. Captivated by the book, I read it in one day.  Kudos once again to our master of dystopian novels. I do love that she focuses on human motivations and interactions instead of volcanoes and tidal waves.

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